Support our Superheroes in Helping Humans Heal. 

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Support our Superheroes in Helping Humans Heal. 

Help Humans Heal

The Good Dog Foundation

As 2019 comes to a close, and generosity of spirit is in the air, we ask for your support. Your donation will help empower our extraordinary therapy dog teams to train with experts in the industry.

Donate today

How Can You Help Humans Heal?

The Good Dog Foundation trains hundreds of therapy dog teams every year to bring their loving skills to over 300 partner hospitals, schools, senior homes, libraries, and community centers. Your generous support helps defray the cost of training future Good Dog volunteers and supports sending teams to partner facilities free of charge.

Volunteer

Have a dog and interested in donating your time? Volunteer today.

Partner

Interested in partnering with Good Dog through your company? Connect with our team today.

While our Good Dog teams may occasionally wear spunky costumes, they wear their blue and orange vests and bandanas on visits. These brave teams enter the lives of people in need, they help children overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles, and comfort the hurting. 

Helping the Hurting

How Can You Help Humans Heal?

Through your monthly donation these animals are able to assist in intervening in some of the most desperate of circumstances. Each of our therapy dog teams tap into the innate love dogs have for humans and use that love to help all of us heal.

A One-Time Donation

Your one-time gift helps the Good Dog Foundation train teams and facilitate volunteer visits.

A Reccuring Donation

Through your reccuring donation we're able to explore scientific research with Universities like Yale, University of Pennsylvania, and Pace University.

Employer Matching Program

Through employer matching programs our team is able to expand our reach to new areas and provide emergency services.

4-year-old Golden Retriever

Brody

Brody loves his work as a therapy dog. At the Marine base, he can tell many of the Marines have been through traumatic incidents, and he gives each soldier what they need. Staying longer with some than others – especially with those having a bad day – he often buries his big head between their legs.

5-year-old Pomeranian

PomPom

Early in PomPom’s therapy dog career, she encountered a gentleman who said he was afraid of dogs. However, he was brave and after a few interactions with gentle, friendly Pom, he now talks about how he isn’t scared anymore.

Help Humans Heal